How to 3D Print Fashion Wearable Technology Ideas by Collette Costello – How to Start a Fashion Company Series

3D printed fashion is big news, as wearable technology companies are searching for the idea that will hit the mainstream and make millions, experimenting with anything from 3D printed dresses, shoes, to clothes you can order and print yourself at home.

As a fashion designer I wanted to know what was all the fuss was about and decided to have ago at 3D printed fashion.  So I purchased a Da Vinci printer for around £250, it was so big and heavy I could not lift it so sent it back.  Instead I bought a Da Vinci Mini for the same price from Ebay, it had still had a print size of 15x15x15cm but it was much small and compact.

I quickly realised 3D printing clothes in anyway was really difficult and instead looked at other fashion uses such as clothing tags, another idea I had was to tap into developing retail technology and developed my own 3D printed contactless payment keyring, I believe it is the first of its kind.

To do my 3d printed designs I used illustrator to draw out my ideas and used a great online piece of software to convert my design to 3D called Tinkercad, which I then uploaded into the printer using XYZ software that came with the printer and really easy to use.  I tried Autodesk Fusion 360, 3D modelling software and found it complicated, hard to use.  I love that you can 3D print in all different colours, including glitters, metallics and neon colours, I purchased my 3D print filament from Faberdashery.

I am yet to see any 3D printed fashion products selling in well know shops, so if you are able to come up with a good design you could easily get noticed and you could be 3D print fashion pioneer, so get experimenting.

One comment

  1. […] 3D printed fashion is big news, as wearable technology companies are searching for the idea that will hit the mainstream and make millions, experimenting with anything from 3D printed dresses, shoes, to clothes you can order and print yourself at home.  Some designers like Iris Van Herpen have developed 3D printed dresses, they are expensive and not really practical.  Another idea is to use 3D print to make tailor made garments like in Janne Kyattanen’s project lost luggage, predicting that in the future we will re-print our belongings when we arrive at our travel destination, cutting down on the need to carry luggage, imagine!  I have done my own work with 3D printed fashion and feel the best use is for small details like buttons, clothing labels or contactless payment key-rings. […]

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